Posts by: Heidi Volpe

The Daily Edit – Wired: Benedict Redgrove

- - The Daily Edit





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Creative Director: Andrew Diprose
Director of Photography: Steve Pec
Deputy Director of Photography: Dalia Nassimi
Photographer: Benedict Redgrove


These never-before-seen photographs are part of an eight-year project that took photographer Benedict Redgrove deep inside three NASA facilities across the US. He uses Alpa MAX and 12 STC cameras, stitching together multiple images to create photographs with an epic quality. “I shoot about 40 images,” he explains, “then layer them to achieve the highest definition.” Redgrove’s project won’t be complete until 2018, but WIRED offered its readers an exclusive glimpse into his epic space journey in its 11.16 issue.

Was this photo essay presented to you by Benedict Redgrove with a six-year timeline in mind?
Benedict came to us when he was three years into the project – it was just a labor of love at that point. He got in touch with us in order to gain deeper access at NASA. He thought a bit of WIRED name-dropping might help, and it did – eventually. It took three years of negotiations, and about 400 emails, to get to this point.

What type of clearance was needed for such unprecedented access?
NASA is a bit like an onion – you peel off layer after layer. We encountered a lot of “We cannot help, you need to talk to so-and-so department” along the way. But the more Benedict shot, the more the various departments in NASA understood what we were trying to do, and the more doors opened to him. It was very much a case of finding the right person to talk to at each stage.

Where were the images taken?
Benedict gained access to the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida, Johnson in Houston and the Smithsonian in Virginia. Next up are the Lunar Lab and training facilities.

Six years is a quite a long time horizon. Was this difficult for the magazine to commit to?
Is it difficult to commit to an elaborate documentation of NASA technology by Benedict Redgrove? Absolutely not – we did not bat an eyelid. It didn’t matter how long it was going to take. We knew the results would be a groundbreaking body of work.

How long will this be a running theme within the magazine?
It’s running across 16 pages (on special paper) in our current issue, November 2016, and of course on We also have a photography exhibition planned at our annual WIRED conference in London on November 3-4, which will also have a Q&A with Benedict himself.

Future plans?
Benedict will conclude his work with the launch of SLS and Orion in 2018. After that, there are talks of a book and an expansive exhibition with virtually life-size prints!

NASA is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government, how did this end up in WIRED UK, and how much was published in the US version?
Interest in NASA is not restricted to the US – it has universal appeal. Benedict put it very nicely himself: “To me, there is no other organisation in the world that is more progressive, more exciting or stands more for the betterment of mankind and peace than Nasa. In my opinion, it’s the greatest institution in the world. It involves, science, art, design, engineering, manufacturing, passion, belief, education, information, creation and technology. It’s always moving forward, always seeking answers and finding them, then asking more questions. They educate us, inform us not only about the Universe but also about our planet, and pass down technologies into our everyday lives.”

This collaboration was solely with WIRED UK, but other international editions of WIRED are keen on running the story too. Watch this space.


The Daily Promo – Doug Human

- - The Daily Promo




Doug Human

Who printed it?

Newspaperclub of the UK.  They are a news bureau and they print traditional and digital on news print stock.  They have begun to introduce a cleaner/brighter stock to offer a snappier color and sharpness.  Still having the properties of newsprint.  I loved the alternative approach and giving modern images a throwback to something nostalgic or reminiscent of a slowly dying print industry (newspapers).

Who designed it?
Art Director and Designer Marek Hosek of Boulder CO.  He was an Chicagoan and moved out west a year or so ago.  A friend and colleague.  I went to him for guidance and an approach I would not think of.  Amazing talent and offered this format when I suggested I wanted to explore Newsprint.  He is a fantastic idea guy and I knew his collaboration would allow alternative process as well as unconventional ideas.

Who edited the images?
The editing (like my site) was done primarily by me and Marek.  I made a collection of product ideas and concepts to Marek and he suggested this layout and image selection.

How many did you make?
I went for the traditional “digital tabloid” @ 52gsm.  200 pcs @ 4 pages.  I’m in the process of creating another sample like it with different and new work.  Piece included a embossing stamp that we created to stamp at leisure on the piece, on envelopes and biz cards.  Also a rubber stamp of Doug Human Photo to add yet another stamp/design treatment.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
This piece is first run of small series of promos.  I had it printed and by the time I had all of my design and mailing snafus taken care of, I didn’t begin sending until early this summer.  (Had an envelope printed and created; USPS suggested this as a no go in terms of mailing success because of placement of addresses and return).  Transitioned into a black envelope.  About every quarter or so and keeping enough on hand for leave behinds of which this has had more success.

The Daily Edit – Fortune: Michael Clinard

- - The Daily Edit







Creative Director: Paul Martinez
Director of Photography: Mia Diehl
Photo Editors: Armin Harris, Michele Taylor
Art Directors: Mike Solita, Peter Herbert, Josue Evilla, Christine Bower-Wright
Retouching and Post-Production: Zach Vitale
Photographer: Michael Clinard

Heidi: How did this come about?
Michael: I met the assigning photo editor, Armin Harris, six years ago at a portfolio event in Manhattan. It took that long to get an email back in May from him asking as to my interest in shooting a feature for their annual 500 issue on Microsoft’s Scott Guthrie and the cloud services division he oversees.

Did you pitch the 500 cover idea or did you have the assignment and the magazine wanted to see what you could come up with?
Neither. Having already shot the portrait component a week earlier at Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, I wasn’t really thinking a server room could be jazzed up all that much because it’s kind of ”blah” subject matter. I’m typically sketching before shoots, but I didn’t know the server facility was being considered for the cover until Armin gave me an “extra credit” assignment the evening before leaving for Quincy, Washington.

Because the magazine publishes what they call under covers — takeoffs on a Fortune 500 cover highlighting other companies featured in the list — he asked I look for details that I could later recontextualize in post. To this end, I thought the best I’d do is some retro-futuristic version of the numeral in glowing, server lights or big, puffy clouds to play on the cloud storage idea.


Did you have to get any special clearance to get inside this room to shoot?
Absolutely, NDAs and special concessions were being shared in the week leading up to the Quincy shoot. Additionally, I was asked to drastically reduce the amount of gear and flash units I’d typically bring in, so I got my kit down to a few heads, some niche grip items and Hasselblad’s tilt shift adapter because there were specific elements (clouds, cords, blinking lights) that I wanted to utilize to help tell this story.

Did they disable the servers?
Ha ha! No, I wish we’d been given the time to create the image fully in-camera, but I only had a couple hours to shoot multiple locations. I should note that I was given a folder of scouting pics to study before the shoot, so the only big allowance was that I was given a ten minute window to shoot in complete darkness to create the long-exposure image that opened the article.
This blue and green image was created in-camera?
Yes, it’s a 16 second exposure balanced with off-camera strobe. It is the style and direction I’d intended to take the cover since laying the number 500 in the shadows of the composition seemed doable. It was imperative I left the facility with enough image assets to create the final cover magic conjured in my sketches.


Was there a discussion about which typeface the number 500 would take?
Yes, font and typeface was very important. At one point, we entertained a big loopy five, but Armin shared a number of Fortune 500 covers throughout the years to help the entire team hone in on the best direction. In the end, we enjoyed the idea that the viewer might need do a double take to notice anything out of the ordinary, so our representation method mimicked the orderly presentation of wires and cables already evident on the server arrays.

How long did it take to create the final cover composite once the direction was chosen?
With retouching by Zach Vitale and under the esteemed direction of Mr. Harris, we delivered the final composite in a few days. A tremendous honor and privilege to execute, the image ran as both the international cover and national TOC page back in mid-June.

The Daily Promo: Alison Conklin

- - The Daily Promo









Alison Conklin

Who printed it?  
Blurb printed the promo piece. What is nice about this is that you can order as many or as little copies as you need and then of course reorder without any sort of minimum requirement.

Who designed it?
The talented group over at Curious & Company – I had a great time working with them.

Who edited the images?  
I edit all of my own images as far as color and touch-ups. For this promo I gave the designers a collection of my favorite images with notes on which ones I really wanted to be highlighted in the book and they curated what went on the pages.

How many did you make?
I made 100. I have mailed about half and the rest I hand out to perspective clients in person when we have our initial meeting.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
This year I have sent out two. The first promo I made in 2016 was an editorial one focusing on my food and portrait photography and then I decided to make this one which featured my wedding photography work.

I loved the concept of using popular song names with the photos. I thought it was sort of a whimsical combination and perfect for the collection of work I was featuring. Another piece of this promo that I love is the mailing label. I wanted it to stand out right away if you were sorting through your mail and I think it achieves that. I used one of the images that Palm Press turned into a greeting card in their 2016 Wedding line for my personal note; I thought it was a fun fit.

The Daily Edit – National Geographic Magazine: Ami Vitale

- - The Daily Edit

Please read the entire story here.

Photograph by Ami Vitale Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in Wolong Nature Reserve. Her name, whose characters represent Japan and China, celebrates the friendship between the two nations. Ye Ye’s cub Hua Yan (Pretty Girl) is being trained for release into the wild.

Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in Wolong Nature Reserve. Her name, whose characters represent Japan and China, celebrates the friendship between the two nations. Ye Ye’s cub Hua Yan (Pretty Girl) is being trained for release into the wild. © Ami Vitale / National Geographic

Photograph by Ami Vitale Zhang Hemin—“Papa Panda” to his staff—poses with cubs born in 2015 at Bifengxia Panda Base. “Some local people say giant pandas have magic powers,” says Zhang, who directs many of China’s panda conservation efforts. “To me, they simply represent beauty and peace.

Zhang Hemin—“Papa Panda” to his staff—poses with cubs born in 2015 at Bifengxia Panda Base. “Some local people say giant pandas have magic powers,” says Zhang, who directs many of China’s panda conservation efforts. “To me, they simply represent beauty and peace.” © Ami Vitale / National Geographic

Photography by Ami Vitale Is a panda cub fooled by a panda suit? That’s the hope at Wolong’s Hetaoping center, where captive-bred bears training for life in the wild are kept relatively sheltered from human contact, even during a rare hands-on checkup.

Is a panda cub fooled by a panda suit? That’s the hope at Wolong’s Hetaoping center, where captive-bred bears training for life in the wild are kept relatively sheltered from human contact, even during a rare hands-on checkup. © Ami Vitale / National Geographic

Photograph by Ami Vitale Wolong Reserve keepers transport Hua Jiao (Delicate Beauty) for a health check before she nishes “wild training.” The habitat also protects red pandas, pheasant, tufted deer, and other species that bene t from giant panda conservation.

Wolong Reserve keepers transport Hua Jiao (Delicate Beauty) for a health check before she nishes “wild training.” The habitat also protects red pandas, pheasant, tufted deer, and other species that bene t from giant panda conservation. © Ami Vitale / National Geographic

Photograph by Ami Vitale In a large forested enclosure of the Wolong Reserve, panda keepers Ma Li and Liu Xiaoqiang listen for radio signals from a collared panda training to be released to the wild. Tracking can tell them how the cub is faring in the rougher terrain up the mountain.

In a large forested enclosure of the Wolong Reserve, panda keepers Ma Li and Liu Xiaoqiang listen for radio signals from a collared panda training to be released to the wild. Tracking can tell them how the cub is faring in the rougher terrain up the mountain. © Ami Vitale / National Geographic



National Geographic Magazine

Director of Photography: Sarah Leen
Creative Director: 
Emmett Smith
Print Designer: 
Hannah Tak
Photo Editor: 
Sadie Quarrier 
Photographer: Ami Vitale

Heidi: How did you find yourself shooting people in panda suits raising captive babies at the Wolong center of the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda?
Ami: I was part of a film team that came in 2013 for PBS/NatGeo production. Realized what an extraordinary story this was and pitched it to National Geographic Magazine once I got access to it.

Were there any unique challenges and how did you overcome them?
Many challenges. First, I had to pitch a story and convince editors that I could make it unique and different from what was already done. They had published a story on pandas about 7 or 8 years earlier so my job was figuring out what would be special about this story. Also, these are tiny, fragile creatures and the keepers were quite stressed about their health and safety. I had to work around these concerns and was not allowed to use flash so there were technical issues that needed to be solved including flickering fluorescent lights. It means you have to shoot at 30th of a second to avoid having lines going through every image. Pandas make quick rapid movements so coming away with a sharp and compelling image was harder than it might seem. Plus they are solitary creatures who like to hide in the thick bamboo or high up in the treetops when they are young.

I understood from reading the story that bears being trained to live in the semi wild must not get used seeing humans. Did you wear a panda suit too?
Yes! of course. the best part!

What did it smell like, the suit? 
They scent the panda suits with urine but wasn’t too bad because pandas are mostly vegetarian. They smelled more like wet puppies or bamboo.


You’ve had a wide range of experiences, how did this one strike or move you as a photographer?
I was constantly thinking how incredibly privileged it was to be there!! Still can’t believe it and miss them every day!

In your motion work on this piece, Papa Panda describes falling in love with the baby panda’s as if they were your own children, did you share that same sentiment of falling in love?
How can you not fall in love with them. I died of cuteness overload many times over.

How long were you there?
5 visits over the course of 3 years.

Did you have to get any special shots to spend time with the pandas?
No special shots but we were careful, especially around baby pandas. We wore masks, disinfected hands and shoes every time entering new space.

The Daily Edit – Grayson Schaffer

- - The Daily Edit



Grayson Schaffer:  Partner Talweg Creative/ Outside Magazine Editor at Large / Photographer

Heidi: Tell us about your transition from photography to cinematography and what are your thoughts overall about that for photographers?
Grayson: We’re at a point in time where a lot of still photographers are becoming directors. Sometimes that just means buying a Red camera and hanging up a shingle. Sometimes still photographers have clients who are asking for motion as part of a project. From an image-making perspective, motion isn’t that difficult. There are some frame rate and shutter angle considerations that you don’t have to deal with in still photography, but at the end of the day, a frame is still a frame. The hard part is having something to say. And for that, more photographers need to be leaning heavily on their writer friends to figure out what the film is going to be about before you get out there. We see it again and again where competent still photographers—many of whom have sizable Instagram followings and interpret that as a sign from the universe that whatever they do is great—just end up with a series of pretty but disjointed images. We all make crappy movies or write crappy stories from time to time, but you can minimize that if you lean on your talented friends and assume they’re smarter than you.

What made you take to the leap from producing editorial content to producing advertorial or native advertising? 
My personal goal is just to find and report on interesting people. At Outside magazine, that mostly involves finding great characters who are at an inflection point in their lives or careers. It wasn’t until raw cinema camera technology reached the point where we felt like we could get our ideas out onto the screen that we decided we had something to say. At the same time, brands have realized how important stories are. So in a lot of ways the ad world came to us rather than the reverse.

One would think you’d have less control, is that true?
One of the mistakes I see filmmakers make again and again is in sending their work out for criticism and then completely ignoring that criticism either because they’re tired from getting all the way to a rough cut or because they can’t put themselves in their viewer’s shoes to see that the work is missing basic clarity or is overly self-indulgent or precious. Working at a magazine doesn’t give you more control, it just means you get your ass kicked by editors instead of a client. Either way you can’t ignore the feedback. After a few years of it, you realize that they’re trying to fix actual problems and not just make your life miserable. Once you get to the point where your default position is to believe the criticism rather than immediately defend against it, then you’re actually in a place to push back. But, yeah, sometimes commercial clients will sacrifice the story in order to obey the data, stay on message, or avoid getting too real. It’s one reason that the word documentary should be reserved for actual documentaries. That’s gotta stay sacred. Films by brand ambassadors about other brand ambassadors can be amazing to watch. Some of them can even be true and accurate. But I still haven’t come across a brand that has editorial guidelines, fact checkers, or a public editor.

How long has your Talweg been in business and how much have you grown since inception? 
About a year and a half ago, Ryan Heffernan and I had the opportunity to move from production work into being a full-service ad agency. We’ve got a Jedi media planner who’s a real millennial whisperer and a couple of account managers who are super sharp. That core team has allowed us to service clients like New Mexico Tourism and other state agencies. We’ve also been doing work for Yeti coolers and a number of other clients in and out of the outdoor space.

Yeti  has been very successful in getting so much coverage for their brand, what do you attribute this to?
The word storytelling has been getting thrown around a lot lately. There was that great rant by an Austrian designer recently about how that term gets misused.

If you’ve been watching social media, you’d think storytelling was anything where somebody reads poetry in an affected voice while slow motion pictures roll by. But Yeti actually gets it. They find filmmakers they believe in. We all work together to pick characters we believe in, regardless of whether they have any affiliation to Yeti or not. And then we all roll the dice. The very first film in the series was one we did in the Grand Canyon last May called In Current

Our plan was to bring models down the Canyon and have them be “trainees” who were learning the ropes. But about five hours into day one of the trip, we realized that there were actual baggage boatmen who’d been cutting their teeth for years trying to get a shot at rowing a dory. We immediately pivoted to focus on this amazing woman Amber Shannon and were lucky enough to have a client—Yeti’s marketing director was with us on the trip—who didn’t hesitate to go with what was real over what was storyboarded. That project laid the groundwork for the Yeti Presents series, which has been a huge success.

What sort of notes can other companies take from Yeti’s playbook in your eyes?
Some agency types have since told us that the branding is way too subtle in these films for their clients’ tastes. Others have told us they’re perfect. We believe that the most important thing is making a film that people want to watch, not one that requires a huge media spend to get eyeballs on it. If I had to chalk up Yeti’s success with these films to one thing it’s that they’re willing to fail. They assign dozens of these 5-7 minute shorts. They don’t all work out. But the ones that do more than make up for the ones that fall short.

The most important thing for a client who wants to get into storytelling (actual storytelling) is to relax their guardrails and trust the process. This is what doc directors, reporters, and editorial photographers have always done. It doesn’t always work out like you planned it but it always works out somehow. In our REI short film Fast Forward, ultra-distance cyclist Lael Wilcox, who was trying to break the record for the Arizona Trail, came down with a respiratory problem only 36 hours into her ride. The record attempt was a disaster, but you ended up believing in her as a character. And that was more important than success.

How do you manage working at a magazine and then working for advertisers at the same time?
I’ve been an editor at large for Outside since April. So I’m not on staff at Outside anymore. Finding time to write and shoot and make movies comes down to working with a great team at Talweg, great editors at Outside, and only swinging at fastballs over the plate.

The Daily Promo: Alex Geana

- - The Daily Promo

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Alex Geana

Who printed it?
I use Overnight Prints for my promos. Eventually I’ll use a fancy printer, but for now they’re really good. Then I make custom notes for all my clients and potential clients. Trying to be as personal as possible. My handwriting isn’t the best, so I like to print all my cards on nice card stock from Paper Source and sign everything. It makes for a really neat and personal presentation.

Who designed it?
I designed and set the images myself. Part of my schooling at SVA was graphic design and I love using the skill set in my photography every day.

Who edited the images?
I did. But with ice cream you have to be quick, so not that many pictures were generated.

How many did you make?
We used 3 bars and about 25 images were created. The print runs on my promos are 250.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
I send hard promos out every 3 to 6 months, then emails out every 45 days. I’m finding that the food theme works really well. Because it’s a visceral connection.

Who was the food stylist?
I was actually the food stylist. I really like putting it together and do all my basic food styling myself. Although I do have great food stylists I work with, when it comes to a promo; I don’t really have a production budget.

Did you shoot specifically for promos?
Yes, I shoot specially for promos, so I have a ton of freedom and do things totally in my wheelhouse, when it comes to styling. This is basically a raw chocolate bar from a bougie chocolate shop in SoHo with chocolate drizzle and fruity pebbles, then gold flexes for color. I used 3 bars and got 25 images.

Why three bars?
I needed 3 bars, because the bite and the drizzle kept on melting. Then if you swap out backgrounds, you get a mess. So if you look carefully, the bar on the red, had the best bite, but the bar on the white background had the best styling as a bar. So I just used both pictures from each set. One for the front, one for the back. I think I’m going to work with donuts next, because the response from this promo was amazing.

The Daily Edit – AFAR: Celine Clanet

- - The Daily Edit






Director of Photography: Tara Guertin
Art Director: Jason Seldon
Associate Photo Editor: Alex Palomino
Photographer: Celine Clanet

Heidi: I read that Creuset translates to cauldron or crucible. In this image the iron is heated  5,184°F (2,862°C) how close could you get to the iron before the heat became too much to bear?
Celine: Well, pretty close actually, but not for too long, that was the thing.

Did you wear special clothing and did it affect your gear?
I just wore regular safety equipment (shoes, glasses). It didn’t affect my gear, but there was just some black dust covering it, covering all of us actually.

How many days did you spend at the factory?
Two full days.

How long did you spend at each assembly line station?
It depended on the visual interest of each one. I remember spending much time on the sanding line: the guys – it’s a guys-only line – were wearing special breathing helmets, moving like robots, grabbing pots, sanding and throwing them out in a beautiful collective ballet. The industrial world is such a ballet.

When you were developing the narrative arc of the story, how did you keep track of big sweeping environmentals, portraits and tight shots to make for a dynamic story?
You have to think of every details that will make the viewer feel the experience of a place, which is basically the point of a magazine assignment. Photography is limited: no sounds, smells, nor movements, therefore every detail possible matters, and I just have this in mind when I shoot. I always try to step back, and ask myself what did I miss to shoot in what I see right now?

Did you review the shoot and then go back to visit anything you feel you may have missed?
No, two days were enough to stick to Afar’s expectations for this assignment.

Which part of the factory drew you in as a photographer?
The foundry. It was such a show.

How did this story come about? Did you pitch this idea to the magazine?
No, they thought of me first, as I do a lot of industrial photographic assignments, outside of my personal work and other kind of assignments.








The Daily Promo – Janelle Jones

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Janelle Jones

Who printed it?
Modern Postcard

Who designed it?

Who edited the images?

How many did you make?

How many times a year do you send out promos?
This was the second mail promo I’ve done, I’m aiming to send out promos four times per year.

If there is some sort of interesting backstory please feel free to share.
This photo of phrosties is from a series about summer drinks commissioned by Vice MUNCHIES.







The Daily Edit – ESPN: Zachary Bako

- - The Daily Edit

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Creative Director ESPN Print & Digital: Chin Wang
Director of Photography: Karen Frank
Senior Photo Editor: Kristine LaManna
Associate Art Director: Linda Pouder
Photographer: Zachary Bako

Heidi: Was this originally a studio shoot which transformed into a roof top option?
Zachary: This was a two-day shoot in Los Angeles. On the first day, we captured the Bennett Brothers working out in Hollywood at Jay Glazer’s Unbreakable Performance Center. Followed by lunch at Stir Market then at Stoopid Buddy Stoodios where Martellus is creating a stop-motion television show. The second day we were at DSR Studios in DTLA, where the rooftop image was created.

What type of direction did you get from the magazine for this section and how many different set ups were you asked to provide?
Kristine placed emphasis on the roof option. Finding a real moment between Michael and Martellus. This would be the most important option for the magazine. I was asked to do a grey seamless and a roof option.

How much time did you have with them?
ESPN’s E:60 film crew was with us for the two days conducting interviews so once they wrapped their set, I was given five minutes as they made camera changes to capture what I needed.
Michael had a meeting across town when the outdoor option had to be shot, so time was extremely limited for this setup.
Initially, the plan was to have them for an hour and a half to shoot singles and doubles on a black and grey set then head to the roof for an outdoor option. In the end, we were given five minutes here and there throughout the day with Michael and Martellus to cover what we needed.

Was it hard to shoot on such a severe slant?
No, it was not. I have been known to hang out of passenger side windows of moving cars to get the shot. This slant was pretty easy.

Did you have them crouching because they were different heights or it just naturally unfolded that way?
It was through direction. When I ran up the slant, I started to slip and my assistant pushed my shoulder into the roof to hold me in place. Martellus commented that my crew really did have my back. We all had a laugh and that is when this image was captured.

Congratulations, I see you have consistency in your “Awards,” can you share your submissions with us for 2016?
Thank you. American Photography is always beautifully curated, here is what I submitted for AP 33.

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The Daily Promo – Mark Peterman

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Mark Peterman

Who printed it?
Next Day Flyers

Who designed it?
I designed it myself. I have a background in design and that was my major in art school. Having experience in layout and a design sensibility has become quite useful for my promotional efforts over the years as a photographer.

Who edited the images?
I edited the content myself although I do have a small group of photo industry friends who I consult on a regular basis regarding promo pieces and editing on projects.

How many did you make?
This last postcard was a run of 750. I sent out 650 and usually keep the remaining stock for leave-behinds for in-person meetings.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
I try to send out a minimum of 3 printed pieces a year and 4-5 email promos a year.

What was the postcard based on?
This postcard was based on an editorial assignment that I shot for The Atlantic. It was a great assignment where I traveled around the country to photograph a cover story that would find the ‘American Futures’ that tell an alternate, positive story to the message put out by mainstream news today. The story appeared in the March 2016 edition of the magazine.


Shortly after the story appeared in the magazine I knew that I wanted to create a promo piece from the project. Because the content was sprawling, I had a lot of material to edit down and wanted to tell the story of the editorial project but also feature everything that I do well: constructing narratives with portraiture, landscapes and reportage. There were several different layouts that I tried, drawing on past promo pieces but didn’t seem to work. I kept reworking the design while looking for a new way to present the material that was unique to the diverse content. After numerous revisions I finally I settled on a gridded layout where the images could play off each other to create an overall feel that supported the images in the right way.







The Daily Promo – Sean Klingelhoefer

- - The Daily Promo

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Sean Klingelhoefer


Who printed it?
I had it printed through Ken at Continental Colorcraft in Monterey Park, CA but it ended up being outsourced to another print shop because they no longer had the HP Indigo printer I’ve grown to love when I have to do digital offset.

Who designed it?
Yours truly. In this case there really isn’t much designing going on but as they say, “no design is good design.”

Who edited the images?
All of the editing was done by myself although there really isn’t much going on aside from a color shift. I wanted to keep this project more abstract and simply in an effort to make a different statement than my usual “car ad work” does.

How many did you make?
I made 500 sets of 4 8×13″ cards.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
It depends on the year but at least 3-6 times a year. I think in the coming years I’m going to start making more of an effort to get more creative with promos.

How did this images series develop?
The photo series was kind of a mistake in general.  I had planned to shoot my friend’s incredible Alfa at El Mirage dry lake bed but as soon I finished paying for a day pass I realized that the lake was actually closed to vehicles. After a two-and-a-half-hour drive from LA and a non-refundable $20 pass ,I figured there was no sense in going home. We decided to cruise around in the Joshua Trees for a while to find something inspiring. It was hot, irritating but I had some prisms, a beautiful car and an open dirt road; I just decided to do some experiments. I tried to capture the feeling of the desert in a story of a mirage which never quite clears and the moment of disillusionment never arrives. When I showed the images to my rep Paige at Fox Creative she was immediately on-board to do something special and targeted with the series.  The result was the lowest count, highest resolution I’ve ever done on a promo. Hopefully the people that receive them will feel the same sort of nervous excitement I had when I made them.

The Daily Edit: Tiny Atlas Update

- - The Daily Edit

bag_11Tiny Atlas Quarterly

Founder/Creative Director: Emily Nathan
Photo Editor: Deb Hearey
Executive Editor: Jennifer Rodrigue.
Recent rebrand (new logo and Solas logo/branding): Mark Sloan who is also Director of Design at Chiat Day


Heidi: We know you are looking into different ways to support Tiny Atlas moving forward. If you were to start your business plan over, what would you have done differently?
Emily: Tiny Atlas is always evolving — we are constantly trying out different ways to bring revenue in. Our team is steeped in creative energy, so the challenge is the business side of TAQ – creating revenue and managing operations. Maybe I should have gone to B-school for an MBA? That would have helped! All joking aside, I’m not sure that we would do anything differently but we would definitely like to expand our relationships and find more like minded brands or entities that are a natural fit and make good partners. When we integrate well fitting partners, it’s very organic and helps the brand thrive versus being too commercial.  We’ve worked with travel destinations, properties, art galleries, art and craft fairs, and fashion brands.  Having more of these relationships to help underwrite the cost of printing another annual is something that would be very positive for us. In addition to the Solas bag with Alite Designs, we have recently teamed up with AllSwell Creative and Earth Missions to create our first  Tiny Atlas Adventure trips. We’re heading to Tofino, BC (October 6 -11 , 2016) and Tahiti (November 9 – 15) with local guides and the promise of lots of photo training opportunities and lots of water.  Not just for surfers, we’ve planned these for anyone who loves the ocean and arts, all levels are welcome.  Since TAQ is all about experience of place, we want to connect with like minded folks off our of screens, in real life, and are really looking forward to these trips.  We’d love to have a few “aphotoeditor” readers join us.
How did the bag idea come about and how did you determine your money goals?
Tae Kim of Alite Designs graciously designed a limited edition bag as a reward for TAQ’s first Kickstarter campaign we held to help fund the printed annual we published in 2013.  The bag was a great success, so we started talking about collaborating on another one. Since a good camera bag is hard to find, we focused on fulfilling that need. The revenue goal for the Solas Kickstarter has been to keep it low and reach it early, which we did.  This means, we will definitely be making the bag – yay! but the more pre-orders we receive, the less expensive the manufacturing becomes. This is important because we’re trying to generate a little profit in order to help move forward as a whole. At this point, it’s challenging to stay ahead of operating expenses, and we’re hoping to reach more people interested in supporting our campaign. If anyone is interested in Tiny Atlas, now is the time to express it!
Was your goal to create a stylish camera bag ?
Yes! Today, so many women are photographers and when you around, most bags are heavy, bulky and masculine.  Solas isn’t just for women but it’s designed with style (simple, easy) and comfort in mind.
What is the concept behind this particular bag and what makes it so different?
The idea was to make a bag we love that also hold a camera. No photographers I know love their camera bags. They put them in a corner and take them out when they need to. When they go out for the day, and don’t want to bring a camera bag, most people just defer to their phones now. Camera bags usually hold some very small non-pro something, or they are huge, bulky, and heavy to start with (or all of the above). We wanted to make something that was lightweight to begin with (since cameras add a lot of weight) but that would just carry what we really needed, which is one DSLR with a lens on it, and a second lens. That is it. Except then there are the things that go with your camera and your life for example, a laptop or a sweater. We designed Solas with the essentials in mind.  We made the right number of zippered pockets, and some padded zipper pockets for your phone and sunglasses or filters, a key leash, and a protective sleeve to store a laptop. I have been beta testing these bags with friends for a year and they’ve helped with R&D — we think we have the perfect balance of lightweight, durable and safely holds the gear we really need. [When I go to the airport, my id goes in the little zippered phone pocket on top, my laptop slips easily out and the camera stays safe in the integrated foam compartment at the base of the bag. If I have a bulky sweater, I use the leather buckle to expand the top section of the bag. ]
How did the relationship develop with Atlite Designs and why them?
When we created our first Kickstarter, Alite backed the project to support us because they liked what we were up to. Afterwards we connected with them to see if there was a project to collaborate on or some such. We put together our first #mytinyatlas show, #lovemytinyatlas, at their shop in the Mission, at the Alite Outpost. The call for entries was a wild success. Tae Kim, the founder of Alite, asked up if we wanted to make a  limited edition bag for the opening. We said, hell yes! Tae designed a really lovely bag, and my sister, Amy Nathan, who is a painter and illustrator, made a special print just for the bag, it was a great success.  Next, somehow, Tae and I started to talk about a  camera bag. We brought in photographers and went through a design process around how they carried their cameras and any issues they had. Then we made prototypes and tested them. I brought different prototypes on shoots with additional photographers to Baja, Hawaii, all over the US and Macao. Finally, we worked on color and the fabric. We wanted something natural and beautiful, but as light as possible.
Along with the online show you are having a show you have another show coming up next Thursday  Sept. 15th from 6-8pm as a preview for the new Independent Art Book Fair in Greenpoint. What are you goals for this and how do you see that supporting the magazine financially?
The September 15th show is bringing the #mytinyatlasSOLAS selections I made alongside curator Cory Jacobs to New York City. NYC has the largest percentage of the @tinyatlasquarterly Instagram community is the world (likely thanks to some nice early support from Design Sponge and Refinery 29 – thanks to both!) and we have not had a show in the city yet. I wanted to bring the beautiful work to the community that supports us. In addition, we will have the bags on hand so people can check them out in person before buying them online. The new fair has an incredible array of independent artists works, as well, so we are hoping to connect both our magazine and our bag with such a perfect audience.
#mytinyatlas has over 1.7 million posts, why do you think it has become viral?
I think #mytinyatlas became viral for a few reasons. One, it is a good name, and easy to write. Two, Tiny Atlas has not really been a commercial venture, so people felt comfortable adding our tag to their personal lives. The mission of the magazine (as a commercial endeavor) as well is to highlight personal stories. Tiny Atlas has a different perspective. We are not principally sharing images that look like postcards, or perceived “perfect” shots. We are looking for unique moments, and personal vision, just like in the magazine. The other reason is because I edit the tag. I am not an inexperienced starter employee, I’m an experienced photographer and editor which helps.


@aquinnm Allison Quinn McCarthy


@aquinnm Allison Quinn McCarthy

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 Kevin Mao @k_mao


@mafyno Maria Fynsk Norup


@moneal Michael O’Neal


@potatopanda Tanya Doan


@saltywings photographer @micgoetze Michael Goetze


@twheat Tyson Wheatley

Your online show had 9K submissions. How did you go about photo editing that and how did you manage all that imagery?
It takes a lot of time; I look through them all and select the ones that resonate most. Then, I take screenshot and then upload the screenshots to a web gallery. We have tried ways to facilitate this online and there are not any tools that are faster than scrolling directly on instagram or on iconosquare and  taking screenshots. Then editing in Bridge. Adobe Creative Cloud is useful as well.

The Daily Edit – Josh Schadel: Good Magazine

- - The Daily Edit

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Good Magazine

Art Director:  Tyler Hoehne
Managing Editor: Caroline Pham
Photographer: Joshua Schaedel


Heidi: What type of direction did you get from the magazine?
Josh: Art Director Tyler Hoehne, the writer Stacey Leasca and myself talked a little about the direction of the piece and the type of emotion that was needed conceptually. Luckily, I have worked with Tyler on a few assignments before; he mentioned certain pictures that I had made in the past for Good, and how to pull some of those moments into this project. The communication was great so I had a pretty good idea what I was after prior to arriving on site.

Did you pitch them this story or was it assigned?
No the assignment was based on the writer Stacey Leasca’s story that she pitched to the magazine after doing a related story on the female prison that is located directly across the street from the men’s facility. Stacey wrote, “The existence of a cosmetology school inside of Valley State Prison is a coincidence of history. The program launched in the mid-‘90s when Valley State opened as a women’s facility. … In 2011, the Public Safety Realignment Act enabled the early release of thousands of low-level offenders across the state. Many of these offenders were women and the decision was made to convert the under populated facility to house men. When these inmates arrived, the California Department of corrections and Rehabilitation chose to maintain the cosmetology program. It currently boasts a near-100 percent graduation rate—one of the highest of any prison education program in the country.”

Did you send promos to the art/photo director?  How did you meet Tyler and how did your creative relationship develop?
No, Tyler came to my studio in Pasadena to hang out with my studio mate and business partner Ben Sanders. We ended up talked a little bit about our photo-illustration business “Those People” and I think he eventually hired us to shoot a food related concept for Good Magazine. Tyler was on set that entire shoot and played with props and lights with us. We really had fun and hit it off. A couple of months later he reached out and said he had a cool assignment that he thought my documentary style would fit for. I had such a great experience on that next assignment and myself and everyone involved just hit it off. After that, Tyler just continued to send me on really interesting assignments.

How many days were you at the prison?
I just went in for a single day. Stacey and myself were allowed in after the inmates were settled in for the day at the Cosmetology school. We went through a normal day of their routine and then just before their day was over we had to go back. In all, I think we spent about five hours with the guys.

Were you able to interact with the inmates without supervision?
There was a Lieutenant that escorted us around but for the most part but once we were in the class we were allowed to walk around the salon pretty freely. If I am correct, to be in this particular program most of the men are exceptionally well behaved. From my perspective, everyone that I met in the cosmetology school really wanted to be there and I never once felt like I wasn’t in a salon.

Were you able to connect enough with the inmates to ask why they pursued this?
I definitely was able to connect with some of them. I have even received a few letters from a couple of the guys that I met. I never really asked them that specific question but for the most part the guys that I talked to said that their ambitions were to take the skills that they learned while they were in this program and find a job. One guys told me, “ It doesn’t matter what you did as long as you make a proper cut.” Some of the guys told me that they had dreams of opening their own Barbershops and Salons when they got out. One gentleman told me that his biggest goal was to get out and cut his daughter’s hair, that one really stuck with me the most.

At any time on this project did your mind ever wander to thinking about why crimes they committed?
During the time I was there I definitely thought about all the stupid things I have done in the past and how lucky I wasn’t on the other side of the lens. I was cornered by a guy on the street, and in defense, I got in a stupid fight near my apartment in Hollywood. I beat the guy so bad I thought I might have well,  don’t even want to say. I waited with bloody hands for hours for the police to come get me but they never did. I went down stairs and it was like nothing had happened. No cars, no cops, no guy, nothing. It was a big wake up call, I got help for my issues, and it changed the entire course of my life for the positive. I have only told a few close friends that story but it was essential for me while shooting this assignment. I went into the assignment knowing I was no better than them and I think they somehow knew that.

I know you are a recent Art Center Grad and have had success with your personal work as well, tell us about your publishing company.
Well, the publishing company, The Fulcrum Press, grew out of my relationship with my business partner Rebecca King. I met Rebecca King after she moved back to LA after graduating from SVA in New York. We hit it off pretty quickly and we started working on a series of publications for a few art shows that I had. It has really become a labor of love, not a day goes by that I don’t think about our publishing company and all the decisions that we are making.

I really love it and love the people that we are working with. We are luck enough to have some really good friends over at The Ice Plant who has really helped us out a lot. Right now, we are pretty excited about the two publications that we are working on and are trying to finish up before the end of 2016.We are not really rushing anything and are just taking our time and enjoying the process of collaborating with our friends, making cool publications that we emotionally and conceptually are attached to. I’m  really fortunate to have such an amazing, like-minded business partner in Rebecca King.

What has been the biggest surprise for you after graduating in terms of commercializing your images?
Ha-ha, that I know nothing. You can only learn so much in school and no matter how much you work on your craft the only way to see what works for you is just trying different things outside your comfort zone. For me the biggest surprise that I learned is how much I really love collaborating with so many different kinds of people. It may sound cheesy but it’s true; it is all about the people that you work with that determines how your day is going to go and how good the images are going to turn out. Good collaborations makes photography so enjoyable. In addition to that, how much you need a good set of friends who will help you along your way. Everyone needs help and having other good friends in the photo industry is such a valuable asset.When a client asks you a question and you can turn to a friend who has been there and they can give you sound advice that makes all the difference in the world. I was really surprised by how many unexpected people really helped me out and supported me and it has motivated me to do the same and pay it forward.

Was there anything that you wish your education prepared you for?
This is hard question for me because I really have no complaints now that I have some distance and perspective. I think every school is different and they have their strengths and weaknesses. I felt like I got a great education at Art Center. I was lucky because I had to paint houses for extra money all the way through school and because of that most of my teachers went out of their way to help me. I still maintain very close relationships with some really great teachers who I still turn to for advice. It’s funny, now that I am teacher, I am asking all of them for teaching advice.

I personally don’t think you are really ever prepared enough till you have to make real life decisions. Balancing life and work and art is difficult after school and getting over that hump and transitioning into a professional practice from an educational practice is tough and you have to learn to forgive yourself for making mistakes. It takes time, which seems like is different for everyone. It’s just one of those things where you have to find your own way of doing things that makes you happy and just don’t stop making pictures. How you act and how you treat people while you are in school will dictate most of your young professional life. It is kind of silly but I wish someone had said that to me.

I think I got really fortunate; I was lucky to have some really great teachers/ mentors while I was going there. I made a lot of really good life-long friends and I don’t know where I would be without the relationships that I made while I was in school. To be honest, nearly every opportunity that has come my way has been a direct connection through some friendship that I made while I was in school. Anything I didn’t learn from my teachers I learned from my friends. Hindsight is always 20/20 but I really can’t complain, I am really happy these days.


To see some more of Josh’s work, 
NowSpace is presenting YIELD, a joint exhibition by Josh Schaedel + Aaron Farley  both are artist in residence there.

The Daily Edit – Foot Wear News: Annie Tritt

- - The Daily Edit

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Foot Wear News

Fashion Direction: Mosha Lundtrom
Fashion Assistant: Christian Allaire
Production: Emily Taylor
Social Editor: Nikara Johns
Assistant: Perry Flowers
Photographer: Annie Tritt

How did you get connected with them?
I originally got connected with them when I was on a shoot for Variety. They share the same photo studio in NY. I was shooting the director of Hamilton which was a really fun shoot and Emily was there to help me. She’s really awesome, we just connected so well; she then introduced me to Mosha and they asked me a few weeks later if I wanted to do the shoot (which I said immediately yes to).

Was this your first assignment with them?
Yes, this was my first assignment with them. We discussed as I said beforehand and had an idea of what we wanted. They were with me on the shoot so we could discuss during what direction to take and what was working especially with the big crowd. I like to work collaboratively and so this worked very well for me. I don’t get to do a lot of fashion so this was really fun.

What type of direction did you get from the magazine?
Mosha and Emily were really great,  we shared ideas back-and-forth. Because I was shooting for the few days before they went out and did some scouting shots and then I did some the day of the shoot, it worked out well. The team is a great team so that made it a joy to do. They originally wanted something softer and more lifestyle But I thought given who the subject was a more “poppy” fun shoot would be better and they agreed. The locations they picked were amazing and I added the lion into the mix.

Were his fans an issue since you were on location and how many days was this?
We had to get a lot done in a day and so I had to work fast. We were also shooting midtown near Grand  Central and the Public Library and there were a ton of crowds around. He bought a big crew with him so every time I shot I was surrounded by a huge crowd of people. He also was SnapChatting during the whole shoot, which with his back to me which may have been the most challenging part. Wale was game to do a lot of things so that made the shoot fun.

The Daily Promo: Julia Vandenoever

- - The Daily Promo

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Julia Vandenoever

Who printed it?
Paper Chase

Who designed it?
Erica Brooks

Who edited the images?
Peter Dennen at Pedro + Jackie took the lead in culling through my images and making a narrow selection. Then we worked together to finalize the images.

How many did you make?
300, I sent out 250 and kept 50 of them for leave behinds.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
Once a year, but my goal this year is twice.

Why did you choose this style of promotion?
The object of the promo was not focusing a singular project, but to show the range of subject that I shoot: food, portraits, lifestyle and kids. I wanted art buyers to get a strong sense of my style in a single promo.

The Daily Edit – The New York Times Magazine: Christopher Anderson

- - The Daily Edit

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The New York Times Magazine

Design Director:
Gail Bichler
Director of Photography: Kathy Ryan
Art Director: Matt Willey
Deputy Art Director: Jason Sfetko
Designers: Frank Augugliaro, Ben Grandgenett, Chloe Scheffe
Associate Photo Editors: Stacey Baker, Amy Kellner, Christine Walsh
Photographer: Christopher Anderson

Heidi: Arguably one of the most stunning covers of the year, what set this particular portrait session apart for you?
Christopher: Well, there is always a different dynamic when the subject is so aware of what is happening in a portrait session. Celebrities are aware of their image, but Chuck is very aware of what you’re doing while making that image.

What type of direction did you get from the magazine and was that amazing composition part of the plan all along?
There wasn’t so much direction other than some of the basics we needed to cover such as room for type etc.  I have a long working relationship with the magazine, so I understand a bit about what their expectations are. Mostly we both knew that we wanted something that felt very intimate

When you shot that image, did you know right away, this is the one? or are there other jewels we didn’t get to see?
There are several images that I like from the shoot, but I knew this is the one I was looking for. There is a slightly different version that I like better purely as a photograph but I understand why this particular one is a better cover. You can see the other one on my instagram and the opener they used was a different image than the cover.

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Were you aware of the subtle type treatment for the cover line going into this project?
No, that came about after the fact. Designer Matt Willey is fantastic

How long did the session take? and in a word, describe the vibe.
I photographed him on a couple of different occasions for this piece, but this sitting was specifically for the portrait. I don’t really remember how long it was, it was a relaxed Sunday afternoon. We did other things like drink coffee and make pictures of his kids and grandchildren. He was under the weather with a cold, so he got a little tired at some point. We took a break to have a coffee and I even think he went to lunch, if I remember correctly.

What did you learn about yourself while shooting this project?
I think when I make a picture that I really like it helps me to better understand what it is I am seeing, what kind of image I make. It is a process.

What type of conversation was happening on set between you two? Did you direct him at all?
We talked about a lot of things, but when we were shooting, we weren’t talking much. I was directing him, but this particular frame, he broke from my direction to look up at me. That spontaneity made the image.

The Daily Promo – Jordan Lutes

- - Agents, The Daily Promo

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Jordan Lutes

Who printed it?
I printed through Overnightprints

Who designed it?
I designed it with the help of a few graphic designer friends I’ve been working with since college- they know my work and ideas as well as I do

Who edited the images?
The images were chosen by me, all from a recent road trip camping and surfing through Portugal. Once we figured out the layout, the images were whittled down with the help of my reps at ETC. The goal was to show my lifestyle work, but also focus on smaller quieter moments to help let the piece breathe a bit.

How many did you make?
I had 400 printed, with 50 of those going to my reps, and another 50 staying with me for meetings and new friends

How many times a year do you send out promos?
Normally one big promo a year, and some personalized smaller ones to targeted people when it seems right. But this year I’ll be sending 4 since this promo is the first part of a new series.

How did this zine come about?
The Portugal zine is the first of part of a four-part series that will be hitting desks over the course of about a year, all centered on recent travels. I just got back from Jordan in the Middle East, so that will be the focus of the next one to go out. There’s already been a much better response to this than any postcard or poster promo I’ve sent; I think the zine has been a nice way to show a fuller perspective of how I shoot. I’ve been capturing a lot of motion on these trips as well -probably more motion than images actually- and working with an editor to turn each trip into a short travel piece as well.