The Daily Edit – Friday
4.20.12

- - The Daily Edit

 

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*Brazil Newsstand Week*

Editor note: Heidi Volpe is in Sao Paulo, Brazil for a magazine redesign project and this weeks Daily Edit comes from the newsstand there. This could be the beginning of periodic visit to the newsstands in other countries.

National Geographic

Editor in Chief: Matthew Shirts
Art Director: Cristina Veit
Senior Editor: Ronaldo Ribeiro
Assistant Editor: Thiago Medaglia
Designer: Roberto Sakai
Coordinator: Cristina Catussatto

Photographer: João Marcos Rosa

Note: Content for The Daily Edit is found on the newsstands. Submissions are not accepted

 

Heidi: How were the photographers protected against the snakes? Did they have any special gear?

Christina: They wore leather protectors over their pants and took extra care to approach the snakes – it’s not an aggressive species; and reacts only when threatened.

Did you have a team of people that were familiar with this variety of snakes?

Our reporters took their chances on the island to accompany the work of the biologists who are studying the species, in a rare opportunity to document the place – journalists and people in general are not authorized to stay overnight on the island, which is a protected area.

How and why do they catch birds?

Between 10 thousand and 12 thousand years ago, when Earth’s last ice-age ended, the area that is now the island was definitively surrounded by water, due to the rising sea level. The population of snakes, which were of the same species as those on the continent (Bothropoides jararaca), became isolated. Without any small mammals to eat, the snakes had to adapt to life in the treetops. The only food available now was birds, which stopped to rest on the island during migrations. The altered eating habits forced changes. While its continental relative has terrestrial habits in its adult life, the golden lancehead has acquired the ability to dangle from tree tops by its tail, which laces around branches to support it.

Why are they so deadly?

There are more than 2 thousand snakes in the island, their venom is five times more potent than that of the continental jararaca.

How close did the photographers get to the snakes? Were they using special lens or cameras

João Marcos Rosa, the photographer got pretty close to the snakes – the biologists gave him directions on how to approach safely. He made a lot of macro shots. But he also used some medium distance lenses – a 200 mm.

 

( here is the story )

The Isle of Snakes

 

The island of Queimada Grande, a granite rock covered in Atlantic Forest, 33 kilometers off the coast of Itanhaém, on the south coast of São Paulo State, is the sole habitat of an endemic species, the golden lancehead (Bothropoides insularis), a yellow pit viper with brown spots that is one of Brazil’s most poisonous snakes.

The island isn’t at all hospitable for visitors, from small migratory birds to the rare human beings who dare set foot in its 78 hectares (72 soccer fields). Because there are no beaches, embarking and disembarking is always complicated, if not impossible. There are no potable water sources or lodgings awaiting researchers. The trails are steep and it is very hot there. There are poisonous spiders and, of course, the snakes – on the ground, in the rocks, in the grass, in the trees, everywhere.

Between 10 thousand and 12 thousand years ago, when Earth’s last ice-age ended, the area that is now the island was definitively surrounded by water, due to the rising sea level. The population of snakes, which were of the same species as those on the continent (Bothropoides jararaca), became isolated. Without any small mammals to eat, the snakes had to adapt to life in the treetops. The only food available now was birds, which stopped to rest on the island during migrations.

The altered eating habits forced changes. While its continental relative has terrestrial habits in its adult life, the golden lancehead has acquired the ability to dangle from tree tops by its tail, which laces around branches to support it. Another difference is in the potency of its venom, which is much more lethal than that of the common jararaca.

Concentrated in such a small area, however, the golden lancehead is endangered. Endogamy leads to the low genetic variability of individuals, which makes them more susceptible to disease and abnormalities. Our reporters took their chances on the island for two weeks to accompany the work of the biologists who are studying the species, in a rare opportunity to document the place – generally, journalists are not authorized to stay overnight on the island, which is a protected area.

 

(captions)

 

Approximately 2 thousand golden lanceheads like this one live on Queimada Grande Island; although few people visit the place, the species is critically endangered.

 

The species’ semi-arboreal habits were acquired when it became isolated from the continent; without mammals on the island, the snakes had to adapt to life in the trees in order to hunt birds, which they kill with venom five times more potent than that of the continental jararaca.

 

Tree-climbing is for grown-ups. During their youth, the snakes live on the ground, also inhabited by animals that serve as nourishment, such as centipedes, snails and small frogs; with no sources of potable water on the island, all of the animals depend on natural repositories, such as bromeliads.

 

In the absence of beaches, landing is always tense, with a more skillful member of the expedition having to tie a rope to serve as support for the others. Once on land, the tents must be assembled quickly, as there is no shelter (natural or artificial) for the few who venture out there, such as the members of the Galápagos/Instituto Vital Brazil expedition, who visited the island in 2010.

 

MAP OF THE ISLAND

Located 33 km off the coast of Itanhaém, on the south coast of São Paulo State, Queimada Grande Island is 1.2 km long and has a total of 78 hectares. The highest point is Boa Vista Peak, 210 meters above sea level. Few people are authorized to land, among whom, Brazilian Navy employees who perform maintenance on the lighthouse, installed in the early 20th century and automated in the 1940s, which now runs on solar energy. Researchers visit the island regularly, but few have seen the cave located on the south part of the island. Much of the island is covered in native forest, but thickets of invading species cause large natural fires.

Breeding golden lanceheads in captivity is one solution for studying them at close range and also creating a genetic reserve – 71 live outside of their habitat nowadays, such as these specimens at the Instituto Vital Brazil, in Rio de Janeiro. This baby snake was born in captivity. Its descendents may one day be introduced to the island to increase the genetic variability of its population, where there is currently a high degree of consanguinity.

 

 

 

Still Images In Great Advertising – Joshua Dalsimer

Still Images In Great Advertising, is a column where Suzanne Sease discovers great advertising images and then speaks with the photographers about it.

Great advertising takes on many different venues and in this ever-changing world, it means web as well.  This campaign was commissioned for web only, but I personally think it would be effective in conventional print.  I reached out to Joshua Dalsimer and his agent Kristina Snyder at Redux Reps to find out more about this campaign.

Suzanne:  This is an interesting campaign but when I go the actual site ruelala.com I only get to see one image- how are the others being see, are they changing them periodically? And it is an interesting concept, but being so vague, are they getting people to sign up?  Do they have plans to roll out to more mass marketing?

Joshua: Right now it is just images for the login page.  We did not want to force it down every avenue and let it be unique visual that separates it from the other private sale sites.  Rue La La is a web based business that is not only a retailer, but has also become social experience.  We want the members to tweet about the login and let it grow in an organic way.  Give the costumers the feeling of discovery with out jamming it through other media.  The customers look forward to the change and I am constantly getting suggestions of new ideas from customers, friends, and creative people.  There is a part of their site called “the artists of rue” where they blog about our crew and have behind the scenes shots.  People are always curious about the making of and are surprised to see all the work that goes into these.

Suzanne: The scenarios are all very different, what creative input did you have in the process?

Joshua: I came up with the concept of their logo in unexpected places and wrote a bunch of scenarios for the client’s consideration.  I also worked with other creatives to brainstorm as well as find ideas from all over.  Rue La La employees came up with a couple, as well as my brother in law.  Once the ideas are conceived, I work closely with my producer, model maker, retouchers, CGI artists, stylists, etc.  I include everyone in the creation process and rely on everyone’s input to come to the best solution.  These images are a real team effort and I enjoy seeing people utilize their expertise.

Suzanne:  These images can be either elaborate props or extensive retouching- which direction was it?  or a combination of both?

Joshua: A combination of both.  We do a lot of planning and review the best choices possible for each scenario.  Obviously there is a limit to the budget, so we need to factor that in and be efficient as possible.  The one thing, that might be obvious, is no matter how great a prop is or how fabulous your retoucher is, if we don’t provide great elements in the beginning we do not end up with a great piece.  There is a limit to how much you can fake and the less faking you do the better.

Note: Content for Still Images In Great Advertising is found. Submissions are not accepted.

Joshua Dalsimer’s professional career started at age 16, not with a camera in his hands but with a pair of drum sticks.  When some of us were lucky to hold down a job at dairy queen, Joshua was off touring as the drummer for the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. After several years with the Bosstones, Josh played with a few other bands landing record deals with both major and independent labels. After several tours and albums he realized there were other creative outlets he wanted to explore. “I always looked at drums and photography as very similar disciplines.” He says, both take place behind the scene. However, both lay down a foundation that helps create a look or sound.” Joshua adds, “collaboration is also very important for both. music helped me learn how to communicate clearly about ideas with other creative people.” Joshua currently lives in New York with his wife Lisa and his kids, Adele, Noah and Sam.

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies.

You Can’t Recreate The Past

- - Blog News

No matter how fast you shovel digital dirt into the chasm of print loss, you can’t recreate the past; you can’t fill the hole. Now, though, we see new foundations being set and fresher building — with more realistic expectations — begun. The change is a huge one. Where once top newspaper company execs eschewed new initiatives as too small with which to bother, the awareness that the old business simply is never coming back has almost sunk in.

via Nieman Journalism Lab.

The Daily Edit – Thursday
4.19.12

- - The Daily Edit

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*Brazil Newsstand Week*

Editor note: Heidi Volpe is in Sao Paulo, Brazil for a magazine redesign project and this weeks Daily Edit comes from the newsstand there. This could be the beginning of periodic visit to the newsstands in other countries.

Placar

Director de Arte: Rogerio Andrade
Designer: L.E. Ratto

Photographer: Renato Pizutto

Note: Content for The Daily Edit is found on the newsstands. Submissions are not accepted

 

Influenced By The Way Computers See The World

- - The Future

I stumbled upon this idea called “The New Aesthetic” yesterday while I was thinking about photographers harnessing and making sense of the photographic noise online. When I think about people tackling projects that are important and ambitious they almost always include writing, photography and video. What I see as the elephant in the room is ignoring the millions of images already available and sitting online in social applications and the images being churned out by the second as you work on your project.

But, when I mention curation the immediate thought is to see yourself sifting thorough piles of crappy images looking for gems to add to your project. So, when JB sent me a link to hyperallergic.com and I discovered a story titled “Is the New Aesthetic a Thing? ” I had a Eureka moment. New Aesthetic is “an aesthetic influenced by the way computers see the world” which is being interpreted in many ways (including annoying 8-bit despite the fact that everyone is raving about retina displays), but what makes sense to me is that what’s online is presented in ways that only computers can. Mostly I think of algorithmic interpretations where programs do the sifting, but there are other examples of people using the resources to create interesting works:

Michael Wolf’s street view.

Pep Ventosa’s collective snapshot.

So, after reading lots of articles on “The New Aesthetic” (new-aesthetic.tumblr.com, An Essay on the New Aesthetic, Noisy Decent Graphics,Why the New Aesthetic isn’t about 8bit retro, Responding To Bruce Sterling’s “Essay On The New Aesthetic, Report from Austin, Texas, on the New Aesthetic panel at SXSW. ) I honestly don’t know what it will look like when people apply the idea to their projects, but I do see an elephant in the room, so instead of reacting with fear I think everyone should be thinking of ways to own and incorporate “The New Aesthetic” into projects.

I had to abandon traditional notions of photographic documentation, truth and representation

- - Blog News

…people hold onto the creaky, dusty notion of photographs as some sort of reality; this only increases the potential for complexity through the many different possible readings of work that challenges or contradicts this restrictive perception of what a photograph is or what it can do. I consider this a wonderful gift to me as an artist, or any artist making work that disregards this concern with the real.

Read more on Conscientious Extended | A Conversation with Christian Patterson.

The Daily Edit – Wednesday
4.18.21

- - The Daily Edit

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*Brazil Newsstand Week*

Editor note: Heidi Volpe is in Sao Paulo, Brazil for a magazine redesign project and this weeks Daily Edit comes from the newsstand there. This could be the beginning of periodic visit to the newsstands in other countries.

TRIP

Director de Arte: Edu Hirama
Editores de Arte: Alex Vargas Cassalho e Camilla Fudissaku 

Photographer: Gabriela MO

Note: Content for The Daily Edit is found on the newsstands. Submissions are not accepted

Harness And Make Sense Of The Noise

- - The Future

If anything is the antithesis of Instagram it’s Mary Ellen Mark carrying a 400 pound Polaroid 20×24 Land Camera into your prom to make a picture. And, if anything separates professional photographers from the pack it’s a book like Prom: a collection of 137 portraits from 13 schools across the country, shot between 2006 and 2009 that includes a documentary produced by Mark’s husband, Martin Bell (story on NPR: Not Your Average Prom Portraits).

But, I think professionals are doing their audience a disservice by not figuring out a way to incorporate the millions of images available online into projects of this scope. Whether it’s some kind of curation, software automated mining or public participation, ignoring that resource is a mistake. This is a wonderful and unknown time for photography, everyone should consider ways to harness and make sense of all that noise.

The Daily Edit – Tuesday
4.17.21

- - The Daily Edit

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*Brazil Newsstand Week*

Editor note: Heidi Volpe is in Sao Paulo, Brazil for a magazine redesign project and this weeks Daily Edit comes from the newsstand there. This could be the beginning of periodic visit to the newsstands in other countries.

Bravo

Editor de Arte: Thiago Melo
Editora de Fotographia: Valeria Mendoca
Designers: Renata Miwa e Thiago Bolotta 

Photographer: Daniel Klajmic

Note: Content for The Daily Edit is found on the newsstands. Submissions are not accepted

Instagram Joins The Brownie As The Next Great Photography Disruptor

- - The Future

In an article on La Letter De La Photograpie, Paul Melcher says Instagram just showed the world that “there is no limit to what photography can earn.” That is of course in reaction to the 1 billion dollars Facebook paid to acquire the company last week. Paul goes on to describe the leaps that evolve photography from the massive camera to the instamatic, from manual to automatic (focus, metering and imaging) and how a company that figured out how to make crappy phone camera images look interesting and easy to share, can suddenly be worth a billion dollars without a dime of profits on the income statement (read the whole article here).

This, my friends, is a trend in business called “Software Will Eat The World” coined in an article for the Wall Street Journal by Marc Andreessen (here):

we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Why is this happening now?

Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale.

Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day.

On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries—without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees.

Which explains how a company with 13 employees and no profits can replace a now bankrupt company that once employed over 120,000 people with annual sales of $10 billion as the “manufacturer” of a device to bring photography to the masses.

 

Thanks To Santa Fe Photographic Workshops

- - Sponsor Thanks

A big thank you to Santa Fe Photographic Workshops for sponsoring the blog this week.

Santa Fe Photographic Workshops offers state-of-the-art photographic education that supports participants of all levels.

•    We share our passion for photography, offering world-renowned instructors, cutting-edge technology, and dedicated staff.

•    We are committed to excellence, teaching both the technical and creative aspects of photography.

•    We provide a supportive, inspirational community where our participants build confidence in achieving their photographic goals both personally and professionally.

YES, I still have a printed portfolio

- - Blog News

All technology has done for me is allowed me to adapt my portfolio to more platforms, i.e. web, iPad, etc.  I used to have 12 printed portfolios, now I use less than half that.  A magazine hasn’t called in a “book” in over three years now, but agencies sometimes still want them.  And my agent, Big Leo, takes them to portfolio meetings where having a tangible thing to touch still has value.  And to be honest, printed portfolios are really nice when done well.

read the whole post on Less Is More.

The Daily Edit – Monday
4.16.12

- - The Daily Edit
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*Brazil Newsstand Week*

Editor note: Heidi Volpe is in Sao Paulo, Brazil for a magazine redesign project and this weeks Daily Edit comes from the newsstand there. This could be the beginning of periodic visit to the newsstands in other countries.

Claudia

Designers: Anna Claudia Ando Tani, Nelson A. Darakdian Eufracio, Sandro Ricardo Marques Soares

Photographer:Ricardo Correa

Note: Content for The Daily Edit is found on the newsstands. Submissions are not accepted

Magazines Fumble the iPad Opportunity

- - Blog News

“I don’t think there’s anything magazine-like out there that’s really resonating or working,” said Khoi Vinh, former design director for The New York Times. “Ultimately, the concept of a magazine feels like an uncomfortable fit for this platform. It shouldn’t be a packaged slate of content; it’s an awkward fit for a connected device that can be up to the minute.”

via, RexBlog, and Digiday.

This Week In Photography Books – Claudine Doury

- - Photo Books

by Jonathan Blaustein

Henceforth, I’ll be the guy that announced his wife’s pregnancy in a book review. There’s no way around it. That’s me now. I’m that guy.

And what of it? It means I’ve decided to share details about my life with you, our readership. Why would I do such a thing? Is it to ensure that these articles are interesting enough to hold your attention? Sure.

Or maybe it’s because the more you know about me, the more perspective you’ll have on my opinions? That’s true too. Because I really am just a guy sitting in his library, (soon to be nursery,) surrounded by photo-books, banging out the content each week. So the way I see it, the more you know about my taste and decision-making, the more capably you’ll decide when I’m wrong. (Or full of shit.)

So now you know that I’m going to have a daughter at the end of Summer. I already have a son, and a brother, who also has two sons. What do I now about raising a girl? Not much.

On the plus side, as an artist, I get to discuss my feelings. Heck, I get to be aware that I have feelings, which is more than I can say for many an American male. But yes, I have plenty of feminine characteristics to balance out the testosterone. Just last night, I had a chat about emotions with my Mom. Sure, I made her cry, but it was the good kind.

But as to rearing a little baby girl from scratch? I haven’t got a clue. I was weaned on sports, smacking my brother around, and slogging through the stream in the backyard. I’ve never played with dolls, (action figures are different,) and like many a man, have long harbored deep fears about what it will be like when my daughter’s first boyfriend (or girlfriend) shows up at the door with a smirk on his/her face. It’s a common fear, and one I’m looking forward to meeting head on.

But really, what am I in for? Where should I turn for a glimpse of what the future holds? How about a photo-book? (Yes, I’m sure you saw that coming this time.) In particular, let’s take a look at “Sasha,” by Claudine Doury, recently released by Le Caillou Bleu. (With an essay by my good friend Melanie McWhorter.)

I think someone made a comment about “Haiiro,” something about judging a book by its cover. Well, you can do that here as well. On a beautiful block of green fabric sits a black silhouette of a bird. Smallish, it might be a finch, or something like that. (Lacking details, as it’s black, we can’t tell.) But it sure is pretty. Open up and the inside of the cover is mauve, which is like a cross between pink and lavender. Again, pretty. (And it goes so well with the green.)

Flipping towards the photographs, which ought to be more important, we see a succession of images featuring a girl, whom we can only presume to be Sasha. She’s a late adolescent, maybe 12 or 13, if I had to guess, and is joined by a friend or two in many of the images. And what do they do? Play dead, imagine things, frolic in the mud, cavort covered with weeds, conjure spells cast with burning witch-ly sticks. In short, they live in imaginary worlds, no different from boys, in theory.

I suppose it’s a feminine version of what I did with my buddies back in the day, and what my son does now. In pre-school, we fought over who got to be Superman, and co-ordinated our Underroos. By Kindergarten, the teacher made us take turns pretending to be Luke Skywalker. On the playground, it was an endless blur of kickball games that always seemed to end in tears. (Yes, mine. I was a sensitive lad.)

No, really, back to the book. The photographs are well made, with a somber earth tone palette, and a healthy dash of mystery. Like when Sasha walks on water. (Thank you, Photoshop.) When the girls are running in mud, they made me think Ana Mendieta and her Earth art. Buried under the tall green grass up to her neck, eyes averted, Sasha plays dead. She’s always up to something, whether staring at leeches, presenting a blonde pony tail in a box, petting the bird from the cover, or pretending to suffocate while covered in a plastic sheet.

Is this my future? I don’t know. None of us do. But as I always say, I like to be surprised by a good photo-book, to learn new things, to witness fresh perspectives. “Sasha” did this for me; helped me visualize the unknown, which is the scariest thing of all. Will it do the same for you?

Bottom line: Lovely book, filled with pretend magic

To purchase Sasha visit Photo-Eye

Full Disclosure: Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

 

The Daily Edit – Friday
4.13.12

- - The Daily Edit

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Town&Country

Creative Director: Alexandra Kotur
Design Director: Edward Leida
Photo Director: Leslie Williams
Deputy Photo Editor: Devin J. Traineau
Associate Art Director: Effie Tsu

Photographer: Arthur Elgort

Note: Content for The Daily Edit is found on the newsstands. Submissions are not accepted