The Art of the Personal Project: Heather Perry

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Heather Perry

Kids in the Hood began as a selfish pursuit of a photograph a day to push me as a creative. I came to it when my son was about 7, and he ran with a band of characters from our neighborhood. As a homeowner, I’d first come to know them as agents of entropy: they’d let the hose run too long, fight and squabble, pilfer from our recycling bin.

Over nearly 10 years of photographing them, the slow magic of parental love seeped beyond the bounds of my kid and onto the kids I got to know through my time in their world. Silently, I cheered, feared, hoped and worried about each of them. When the test of time and circumstance made the project harder – tweens going separate ways, teens inside on phones, Covid isolating us all – the nature of the work changed. Perhaps the biggest hurdle to my ultimate goal for the project was the fact that my son no longer wanted to be photographed on the regular. I struggled with this as a photographer, but ultimately my motherhood won, and I set him free (mostly). I set them all free (mostly). In the end, it was the natural arc of youth that dictated when it was time to stop. What didn’t stop is my love and admiration for each of them.

Dylan’s optimism is legendary, and it just might restore his imagination for what his life can be. I hope that Seamus will remember that joy is as important as the rest of the countless emotions in his head. Perhaps the most captivating kid in this project, Casper has always been utterly authentic and fluid. It seems they are flowing still. My son, Finn, has always seemed just a little concerned. As he’s matured, he’s colored it to look more like apathy or ambivalence to keep the world at bay. I will keep urging him, with and without camera, to trust the world, and most importantly, himself in it.

They’ve all (mostly) graduated from high school now and have chosen very different paths from one another. Almost none of them talk to each other anymore. But I do think and hope that they will forever remember where they came from and the days they spent together.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Kremer/Johnson

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Kremer Johnson

In our latest series, “Personal Space,” we delve into the evolving landscape of the modern workplace, inspired by a New York Times article on large companies encouraging employees to personalize their office spaces to draw them back post-pandemic. This project emerged from the profound shifts we’ve all experienced in our professional lives, highlighting the blend of home and office environments.

To bring this vision to life, we purchased a standard office cubicle, transforming it into five distinct conceptual spaces, each reflecting a unique story of personal identity and professional adaptation. Each image in this series serves as a narrative, portraying how employees reclaim their workspaces with creativity, making them not just places of productivity but extensions of their homes and personalities.

Our goal with “Personal Space” is to capture the essence of this transitional period, where the line between work and home blurs, and the cubicle becomes a canvas for personal storytelling. Through these images, we explore themes of resilience, adaptability, and the human need for connection and expression in the face of change.

This series invites viewers to reflect on their own work environments and the subtle yet profound ways in which they personalize their spaces. It underscores the importance of creating workplaces that foster not only productivity but also well-being and personal fulfillment. “Personal Space” is a tribute to the enduring human spirit and its capacity to adapt and thrive, even in the most unexpected circumstances.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: C J Foeckler

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  CJ Foeckler

I’ve been creating my Christmas card series since 2007.

It originally started as a joke to take a goofy portrait of myself in my single days to give to friends. It’s now turned into a serious project every holiday season that friends and family eagerly await the release of. We like to ‘out-do’ ourselves in terms of goofiness, quirkiness, or cleverness every year. It’s a goal of ours to create something that looks so real in terms of concept and execution, that if it were found on the street, someone would think that it was a real ad, band photo, or album art.

In the early years it was just me, then my cat Opie came along, followed by my wife, and now our two girls. It used to be easy to shoot something goofy, but now it’s become a fun challenge to create a realistic concept that works with all of our family members. Sometimes the concept is a loose idea that is worked out the day that we shoot and release it, and other times it’s figured out months in advance. This year’s concept is already worked out, we just need to purchase some clothing and props and shoot nearer the holiday season.

Last year’s card was the most complete to me in terms of realism and concept. We created a band, a song, album art, and merch. I recorded a simple song with my daughters, shot and designed the album art, and even had a merch site to sell t-shirts, mugs, and prints for family and friends.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Brian Molyneaux

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist: Brian Molyneaux

I endeavor to realize and document beauty every day in the people that surround me wherever I am in this life journey. I am endlessly intrigued by people especially those that appear different than me and I rejoice in experiencing our commonalities. I celebrate unity, diversity, inclusion and love for everyone from every land and all cultures.

I believe that at its core portraiture is a somewhat intrusive act. It is my duty as the photographer to minimize that intrusion and to connect as honestly, thoughtfully and respectfully as I possibly can.

My latest personal project This Is What Jewish Looks Like started over a year ago through a desire of mine to represent people with truth and dignity. In this first phase of my project, I photographed 60 Jewish people of diverse backgrounds, race, and origins over the course of 3 days. This imagery was compiled in collaboration with Reboot and released as a Public Service Announcement on MTV, Paramount, Showtime, and their affiliated channels in celebration of Jewish American Heritage Month.

As with all of my work I am dedicated to finding that beauty that we all share as human beings floating around on this planet and I treasure our connections. I am only scratching the surface with where I am going next with this project of capturing diversity and inclusion in the Jewish faith. I welcome you all to follow along.

 

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Josh Scott

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Josh Scott

Waterway is an ongoing project I started in 2009 just after buying a house on the Detroit River.

This series of images is focused on foggy mornings when things are quiet, calm, and surreal.

It’s a magical time to be on the river as threads of mist permeate from the water into the cool air leaving it a horizonless abyss, disorienting, removing any visual reference to direction.

It’s a time to explore, watch, and wonder as the breeze rolls blankets of fog into various tunnels of sight and the sun’s rays of light fight relentlessly to burn through the thick moist air.

Sometimes without warning the fog will just vanish leaving this mysterious place behind, and you’re left waiting for the next time the fog will play with your mind.

 

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Dirk Anschutz

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Dirk Anschutz

 

I am the father of a young boy and the only child of a single mom.  I’ve never met my dad.

I’ve been traveling around the US to take portraits of fathers and sons from many different cultural, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. The different ways you can grow up in this country are astounding but many challenges for fathers and sons and the love between them are still the same.

The most basic role of a father is to protect his child while also allowing the kid to learn and grow by failing and getting hurt (but not too much).  It’s a constant balancing of preaching caution and abandon. On top of that there’s the expected guidance in inter-personal, scholastic, tech-related, sexual (dear Lord, no!), and financial behavior.  Plus installing a basic value system for dealing with a constantly changing world.  What could possibly go wrong?

Obviously, the father-son-relationship is incredibly influential for both.  Many times, a son will follow in his dad’s footsteps, and most dads have to make big life changes to accommodate their children.  Children might have to return the favor when their parents grow old.

I’ve tried to capture all of these things in my images.  But the glue that holds everything together is the love between a parent and a child.  It’s primal and fundamental.  If it’s not there for whatever reason, it’s probably hard to have a good lifelong relationship and it’s probably hard for the child to develop all the tools needed for a good life.  If the love is there, there’s a good chance it will carry father and son through all their difficulties and shortcomings.  Probably everybody who had a child can recall the feeling when your baby’s lying on your chest.  It’s glorious and terrifying all at the same time and it really changes your life forever.

Andrew & Homer, Brooklyn, NY, 2016

Homer is 9 days old in this image and I think you can see here the foundation of everything. The love between a parent and a child is so primal and fundamental. If it’s not there for whatever reason it’s probably hard to have a good life-long relationship and it won’t be easy for the child to develop all the tools he or she needs for a good life. If the love is there, there’s a good chance it will  carry father and son through all their difficulties and shortcomings. Probably everyone who has had a child can remember the feeling of your baby lying on your chest. It’s glorious and terrifying all at the same time and it changes your life forever.

Fung Kit (Michael) & Wing-Hong (Andrew), Mountain View, CA, 2023

Fung Kit immigrated from China to study in the US. He stayed on and became an engineer for Hershey’s Chocolate in Pennsylvania. He and Andrew live now in separate apartments at the same complex in Silicon Valley where Andrew is the founder of a tech startup. Andrew invited his friends Brian and Louisa for a game of mahjong with his dad. (Fung Kit mopped the floor with the young people.)

Jason & Chester, Jupiter, FL, 2018

Jason is a firefighter and surfer. He’s very concerned about safety in his professional life, but as is apparent in this image, he’s also confident in his physical abilities. Like everything in life and fatherhood, it’s about balance.

Jonathan & Benjamin, Randolph, NJ, 2021

Jonathan is a lawyer who is very passionate about hunting. He is the owner of a deer hunting camp in the Poconos. While Benjamin is still too young to go on a proper hunt with his dad, Jonathan is teaching him how to track deer, look for signs of wildlife in the woods and search for antlers that the bucks shed.

Wyatt & Mike, West Point, NY, 2019

Mike graduated from West Point 30 years before Wyatt. He spent 4 years in the Army before he rejoined civilian life. He returned to West Point to celebrate Wyatt’s graduation from the military academy.

Paul & Sonny, San Francisco, CA, 2023

Paul is a craftsman who works with artists to build their creations. He and Sonny went through a very rough time, Paul’s dad passed away and their family dog died while Sonny’s mom had a life threatening health crisis. To keep themselves occupied and grounded they’ve built things like a soapbox car together. Here Sonny is practicing his welding skills in his dad’s workshop.

Paula & Jonathan, Brooklyn, NY, 2018

Paula is a father who transitioned from male to female when she was 61 years old. Both she and Jonathan are pastors. Paula, when she was a man, was a televangelist and ran a mega-church on Long Island. After she transitioned she lost all her jobs with that church and she now leads a small congregation in Colorado. Jonathan, who is the pastor of a church in Brooklyn, wrote a book about the experience of his dad becoming a woman (it wasn’t easy). They gave a TED talk together shortly after our shoot.

Raul & Mario & Salomon & Ramon, Abiquiu, NM, 2021

Salomon was one of the founders of the Abiquiu Volunteer Fire Department. His son Mario is also a volunteer in the same department, Raul is a professional firefighter in Los Alamos, and Ramon is a retired professional firefighter for the Navy in Virginia. They all live in Abiquiu now.

Voodah & Rahmel, Brooklyn, NY, 2019

Voodah is an artist who collaborates with his son in a series of videos. He taught Rahmel meditation and encourages him to meditate often to create a space for himself in a crowded life.

 

To see more of this project, click here

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Brian Pineda

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Brian Pineda

In my images of Muay Thai kickboxers, I traveled to Bangkok, Thailand, capturing these athletes at various training camps and stadiums where they compete. This project captures the dedication, rich tradition, and vibrant pageantry of Muay Thai kickboxers, revealing a world where physical prowess and spiritual depth converge.

My fascination with Muay Thai stems from witnessing the unwavering commitment of these athletes. With my images I aim to show the rigorous training, the moments of silent contemplation, and the dynamic energy of these athletes. The fighters’ expressions, the intricate details of their ceremonial attire, and the intense action sequences all tell a story of honor, respect, and the pursuit of excellence.

This project is a visual homage to the athletes who dedicate their lives to mastering Muay Thai, preserving its legacy for future generations. It is an invitation for viewers to witness the beauty and discipline of this ancient tradition, celebrated in the heart of Bangkok.

The ceremonial rituals, the intricate details of their attire, and the dynamic movements in the ring are all captured to convey the beauty and discipline inherent in Muay Thai. This project is about the spirit and passion that these athletes have for their craft.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Dana Damewood

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist: Dana Damewood

I grew up in the town of Wahoo, NE, population 2,000. I lived on the family farm and went to a one room school in the middle of a corn field. When we moved into town, I spent most of my time at my grandmother’s house. When she decided to move at the age of 97, I wanted to preserve the feeling and memory of the space that always felt like home to me. I remember the way the light came in through her windows and loved that nothing changed there as long as I can remember. I used my vintage Rolleiflex camera to photograph her home and some of the places around town that once seemed mundane but now have great meaning for me.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Kate Medley

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Kate Medley

This body of documentary photographs examines the role of gas stations throughout the South, using these spaces as a lens to study this complex region, the people who live here, and how the populations and priorities of these people are shifting. In a time when our politics are increasingly polarized, our neighborhoods segregated, and our rhetoric strained, still nearly everyone regularly passes through these same commercial spaces. We come together here almost out of necessity, or at least convenience. My images give particular due to the culture and people in these communities—the workers who sustain these gas stations and the customers who rely on them for fuel, food, essential goods, and community. This project puts expressed emphasis on emerging immigrant foodways launching from gas station kitchens—the cuisines of one’s native country and how that is merging with more traditional flavors of the American South, shifting the very definition of what is Southern food. I highlight the egalitarian nature of the gas station, integral to the lives of people in every socioeconomic bracket in the South, especially in rural areas. Spanning more than ten years, this project touches down in 11 southern states, documents more than one hundred gas stations, and features a diverse mix of portraits, scene-setters, details, and documentary images.

To see more of this project, click here

Available for purchase, click here

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I feature personal projects so your work can be seen.  It is so nice to see this project get so much press (I found her in a CNN article and reached out to her). This is the press she has gotten already for this personal project https://www.katemedley.com/news  

 

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Geert Detaeye

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

 

Today’s featured artist: Geert De Taeye

In this photo series, I embark on a journey through inspiring locations that have the power to ignite the imagination. Guided by the virtual lens of Google Street View, I find myself wandering through the digital corridors of the world, embarking on endless virtual walks. Like a spy plane soaring above, I observe the landscape from different angles, seeking out wooded areas, specific architectural styles, and mysterious structures that exude a captivating atmosphere. These locations serve as the foundation upon which I build my narrative.

However, the initial allure of these virtual discoveries often gives way to reality when I visit them in person. Changes in the environment or alterations to the building itself can leave me disappointed. Just as Google Street View captures a moment in time, my photographs also freeze a specific instance. Yet, in their evolution, they reveal the loss or emergence of certain character traits unique to each location.

Every place undoubtedly harbors a story, a history waiting to unfold. These stories become the seeds for my photo series. Approaching with an air of naivety, I engage with the owners of farms, houses, and other inhabited places. My initial intention is to seek permission to capture their residence in an image. With a genuine curiosity, I ask them to share a personal story that resonates deeply with their home. An event or memory that has left an indelible mark and is intimately intertwined with their dwelling. It’s as if I am selecting a still from a movie, immortalizing a moment frozen in time.

The residents’ personal stories form the foundation of my images. Drawing inspiration from their narratives, I create and stage new situations that expand upon the truth, allowing room for interpretation and exaggeration. The resulting photographs, The Nearest Truth, are grounded in true stories yet venture beyond simple documentation. Nothing is quite as it seems, as I aim to create a world where reality and imagination blur together, beckoning viewers to question their own perceptions.

Through this approach, I hope to uncover the hidden narratives embedded within these captivating locations. The fusion of personal stories, carefully constructed staging, and the inherent magic of photography allows me to delve into the depths of human experience and create visual moments that resonate on multiple levels.

In The Nearest Truth, reality dances with the imaginary, prompting viewers to delve deeper into their own interpretations and immerse themselves in a world where tales are told through the lens of a camera.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Gabriele Galimberti

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist: Gabriele Galimberti

Half of all the firearms in the world that are owned by private citizens for non-military purposes are in the United States of America. The overall number, indeed, exceeds the Country’s population: 400 million weapons for 328 million people. This is not a coincidence, nor is it a market-related issue: it is rather a matter of “tradition” and constitutional guarantee established with the Second Amendment, ratified in 1791. This law reassures the inhabitants of the newly independent territories that their Federal Government would not be able, one day, to abuse its authority over them, and they are guaranteed the right to bear arms.

Two hundred and fifty years later, the Second Amendment is still ingrained in all aspects of American life.

Gabriele Galimberti has travelled to every corner of the United States – from New York City to Honolulu – to meet proud gun owners and photograph them and their weapons.
He has photographed people and guns in their homes and neighborhoods, even in places where no one would expect to find such arsenals.

These often-disturbing portraits, together with the accompanying stories based on interviews, provide an unexpected and uncommon view of what the institution of the Second Amendment really represents today.

To see more of this project, click here.

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Amy Selwyn

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Amy Selwyn

With mostly monochromatic hues and an aesthetic that hints at time’s passage, Amy Selwyn’s images invite the viewer into a realm where light and shadow dance in a slow and expressive duet. Each photograph, though distinct in its subject — a cathedral’s vault, a fog-wrapped forest, a solitary bathtub, and a church standing sentinel in a hazy expanse — shares a common thread of contemplation and consideration.

The cathedral’s arching lines reach toward the mysterious of the heavens. The forest scene, veiled in mist, speaks to the enigma of nature’s beauty, her paths less traveled, and the quiet introspection such a world elicits. The soft solitude of the bathtub, framed by morning light, mirrors the intimacy of moments when we confront (welcome?) the naked self.

Collectively, these works are a meditative exploration on solitude, reverence, and the search for meaning amidst the ephemeral. They stand, Selwyn believes, as odes to the quietness in life, the spaces between breaths, the silent stillness that defines our existence. Within these silent vignettes, the artist extends an invitation to pause, to reflect, and to find solace.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Billy Childress

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Billy Childress

 

Back in the heart of Mount Airy, nestled in the warmth of Flat Rock Baptist Church, my roots run deep. Generations of my family found solace within the church walls. It had been a while since I last stepped into the space that cradled both my upbringing and the final farewell to my beloved grandmother. During the pandemic, this town is where I found myself inhabiting Grandma’s old house which is only separated from the church by a graveyard. In the midst of this small town’s struggles, I heard all the churches were closing and it really struck a chord with me because in the south, churches don’t close during hard times. This is where people want to be in a time of need, worry and uncertainty. For his congregation, Pastor Rusty Reed came up with the innovative solution of a Drive-In Church service. While in the parking lot listening on an AM radio station, parishioner’s cars would transform into havens where all could tune in to the pastor’s comforting words. As I embarked on documenting this extraordinary chapter in my town’s history, I chose to capture it in black and white photography knowing the monochromatic palette would deepen the importance of the narrative. To me, black and white supports and keeps the story quality timeless and deep by stripping away the distractions of color. My goal was to emphasizes some of the simple, raw emotions of the community bound by faith during their moments looking for unity.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: The Rathkopfs

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  The Rathkopfs

“Maminka,” the Czech term for mother, and my native language as a Czech immigrant now based in New York, serves as the emotional core of this project. Offering an intimate glimpse into my family’s lives, it chronicles the poignant journey of how my mother, and I reversed roles. In 2016, she became my caregiver during my cancer diagnosis, a role that later reversed in 2022 when she faced a stroke and cancer.

This photographic exploration delves into the shifts in our relationship– from patient to caregiver and caregiver to patient. The images captured the intricate dance of roles between children and parents and shows a candid picture of the challenges we confronted. How hard it is to care for a loved one, and how hard it can be to accept care. Amidst these tribulations, the project unveils the enduring strength of family love, a constant presence that can help transcend the hurdles.

“Maminka” also sheds light on the broader impact of multigenerational caregiving. In addition to my and my husband Jordan’s roles as caregivers in the “Sandwich Generation” (caregiving for aging parents and young children), our son, Jesse, has also found himself helping care for his grandmother as well. Spanning from Jesse’s early childhood to the most recent images in December 2023, the project captures the evolving dynamics. His instinct to assist in caregiving for my mother as she grappled with the lingering effects of recent illnesses, adds another layer to the intricate narrative. Ultimately, this project is a testament to the resilience of familial bonds, specifically the profound transformations that accompany the ebb and flow of caregiving roles across generations.

Anna, navigating her cancer treatment, captured a poignant self-portrait with her mother Helena, who traveled from the Czech Republic to support her through chemotherapy, caring not only for Anna but also her son, Jesse.
Holding Anna’s mother’s hands in the hospital reminded her of her grandfather. “Their hands are so similar, hands that had years of use in them from creating things with their hands.”
Anna holds a mirror steady as Helena delicately applies lipstick during her hospital stay in 2021, following a stroke. For Helena, maintaining her appearance provided a sense of comfort amidst medical challenges. A week later, doctors uncovered another hurdle: Helena was diagnosed with colon cancer, prompting swift treatment.
Anna preparing food for her mother and son as she adjusts to caring for her mother following her stroke and cancer recovery. With her mother’s abilities altered, Anna had to step in to assist her mother with tasks she used to manage independently.
Helena showers in the hospital while recovering from a stroke in 2021. “My mom always spent a lot of time in the shower. She loves the water. It calms her mind.” For the first time in her life, Anna had to assist her mom to shower.
After Helena’s stroke, the entire family embarked on a journey of discovery into the nuances of post-stroke recovery. The constant exhaustion and necessity for frequent naps became apparent, significantly reducing Helena’s usual activity levels. As the family adapted to this new reality, they learned firsthand the complexities of brain recovery after a stroke, emphasizing the importance of patience and time in the rehabilitation process.
“This was one of the moments, nearly nine months after her stroke, when my mom started to seem more like herself pre-stroke,” Anna said. “Her energy, mobility and sense of joy were improving.”
As of December 2023, Helena’s health remains a persistent challenge. She has recently developed breathing issues that have left her medical team uncertain whether it stems from stroke-related issues, complications from cancer, or possibly another underlying cause. Amidst these uncertainties, Jesse, Helena’s grandson and Anna’s son, has grown increasingly aware and concerned about his grandmother’s health.
As of December 2023, Helena’s health remains a persistent challenge. She has recently developed breathing issues that have left her medical team uncertain whether it stems from stroke-related issues, complications from cancer, or possibly another underlying cause. Amidst these uncertainties, Jesse, Helena’s grandson and Anna’s son, has grown increasingly aware and concerned about his grandmother’s health.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Todd Antony

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Todd Antony

The Japanese subculture of ‘Dekotora’ – a portmanteau of the Japanese pronunciations of “decor” and “truck” – involves the elaborate decorating of a truck following a certain theme, or aesthetic. For more than 40 years, Japanese truck drivers have been piling lights, patterned fabrics, and other over-the-top adornments onto their work trucks, creating moving masterpieces covered in LEDs.

The tradition of decorated trucks, or “Dekotora,” originated from a 1970s Japanese movie series that was inspired by Smokey and the Bandit, titled “Torakku Yaro” or “Truck Rascals.” Drivers first began decorating their vehicles in the style seen in the comedy-action films in hopes of being cast in upcoming productions. Eventually the extravagant trucks became a way of life for many workers, with decoration costs sometimes running over $100,000.

The Dekotora craze has passed its zenith of the 80s and 90s and has been in decline recently, numbering in the region of 500 drivers in the country now. The Utamaro-Kai association participates in a number of charity initiatives and has been helping raise funds for some of the areas worst hit by the recent Tsunamis, by staging events in the cities.

Junichi Tajima, the head of the Utamaro says it is not just about raising money though, but about bringing some light and happiness into the lives of those who have been affected. When asked what Dekotora means to him he said that ‘after 40 years, Dekotora is my children, my brothers, my family’.”

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Jennifer MacNeill

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

 

Today’s featured artist:  Jennifer MacNeill

My love of animals combined with a curiosity about people who are very passionate about raising and showing them fueled my desire to photograph various animal shows. This brought me to The Celtic Classic dog show in York, PA.

It was interesting to study how meticulously each animal was groomed and watch the intense focus of the canine and the handler in the ring. Personally, I would never buy a pedigreed pet because there are far too many homeless animals in need, but I can respect a person’s interest in preserving breeds and sharing their love of dogs with the public.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Scott Elmquist

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Scott Elmquist

What started as a newsroom assignment in the early 2000’s, became a personal project spanning 25 years. During those years I attended countless community prayer vigils in Richmond, Virginia, generated by unrelenting gun violence. Simply reporting the facts about each murder weren’t enough. I felt compelled to investigate the murder victims, and communicate with the affected families, sharing their stories visually.

Some prayer vigils were often solemn, intimate events, attended by 25-50 people. The larger vigils resembled New Orleans-style wakes, where people preached, sang, marched and prayed. Regardless of the vigil size, family members spoke lovingly about the victims, and although I was possibly witnessing the most painful moments in their lives, they often thanked me for being there to tell the story.

Unfortunately, this grim story continues to unfold. According to the Virginia Department of Health, from 2018-2022, over 1,000 Virginians died each year due to gun-related violence. Gun violence is now the leading cause of death for children in the U.S. The resulting devastation for families is immeasurable. In June 2019, during Gun Violence Awareness month, I partnered with Initiatives of Change, a Richmond based non-profit, to host “I Am Here,” a three-day interactive exhibit to raise awareness and promote healing from the trauma brought on by gun violence. I displayed photographs from those prayer vigils held in the aftermath of homicide. Hundreds of people attended the event, including families of the homicide victims. Families shared stories, grieved together and joined in a healing drum circle, allowing them to remember and celebrate their murdered loved ones. Shelia Hall Green stood and spoke about her son Omar, who she had buried just four days earlier. Another mother, Brenda Rawlings, said it was the first time she felt normal since her daughter’s murder on New Years’ Eve 2018. Deneene Poole said she felt her son, J.J., who was murdered in 2010, hadn’t been forgotten. Providing visual documentation of the vigils offered some hope that these murder victims, and their families, won’t be forgotten.

Allan Melton, 9, cries during vigil for his father and uncle who were murdered in a double homicide home invasion on May 28th. He is comforted by Alicia Rasin, the founder of Citizens Against Crime, a group that rallied around the families of Richmond’s 78 murder victims in 2006.
Teddy Parham is among those who gathered on a cold Friday night to remember Farooq M. Bhimdi, the owner of the Express Way convenience store on Mechanicsville Turnpike. He was gunned down inside his store on January 28, 2012.

Ricky Burton, 16, was murdered walking home from his late shift at Wendy’s in August 2008. His aunt (pictured here) and about 100 mourners gathered in Delmont Village to say goodbye.

Rotunda Allen of Richmond mourns the death of her friend Kiarri Edwards, 34, at a vigil on Sunday night on Dinwiddie Avenue. Edwards, a father of three, was killed in a triple shooting on the Dinwiddie Avenue on March 31 at 11:16 p.m.

Hundreds of members of the Hillside Court community gathered on the 1700 block of South Lawn Avenue for a vigil in remembrance of 3-year-old Sharmar Hill Jr., who lost his life on February 1, 2020, when he was caught in the crossfire of gun violence outside his home. “This shouldn’t be a war zone — how is your home a war zone?” Shamar Hill Sr. asked, reiterating that his young son was his “hero.”

Still wearing a graduation gown, Jason Kamras, Richmond Public Schools Superintendent, who was flanked by city council president Michael Jones and Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney addressed the media after eighteen-year-old Shawn Jackson was shot and killed on June 6, 2023. The incident occurred just after Huguenot High’s School graduation in the Altria Theater.  Kamras said he “can’t shake the image” of Jackson getting CPR while wearing his graduation gown in Monroe Park, just outside the theater where the shooting took place. Jackson’s stepfather, Renzo Smith, 36, also died in the shooting.

The family of J.J. Poole, 20, stand in disbelief that their family member was murdered near his home in Richmond’s East End in 2009.
Gun violence activist turned mourner; Joyce Kennedy is comforted during the RVA Stop The Violence rally. Her grandson Ra’Keem Adkins, 22, was murdered in Mosby court in May 2015. Prior to her grandson’s murder, Kennedy often spoke out about gun violence.

BIO: Scott Elmquist is the senior photographer for Style Weekly/VPM News based in Richmond, Virginia. His gun violence images have won numerous awards, including being named the Best Alternative Weekly Photographer in North America in 2019 by the Association of Alternative Weeklies, for a portfolio of gun violence images. He was awarded the Best General News Photo First Place award in Virginia by the Virginia News Photographers Association in 2006 and 2008. He also earned dozens of First Place awards and ten Best-In-Show awards in the annual Virginia Press Association contest 2000-2022.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram

The Art of the Personal Project: Billy Childress

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions.

Today’s featured artist:  Billy Childress

This photographic series originated with my exploration of my grandmother’s siblings, a project that unfolded within the confines of the family homestead. Nestled on 8 acres in rural North Carolina, this ancestral compound was comprised of four houses where each sibling resided at the time.

My grandmother, a pivotal figure in my life, epitomized strength in a way that continues to resonate with me today. Spending countless formative years by her side, I absorbed a wealth of life lessons from her. Above all, her unwavering faith stood as the cornerstone of her existence. Together with my grandfather, they built their home behind the family church where she was raised—a place that now echoes with the memories of raising children of my own.

The path of her life took an unexpected turn when my grandfather sustained a gunshot wound to the head in his forties, leaving him blind and brain-dead. From that fateful day onward, my grandmother devoted herself to his care until his last breath. The love they shared and the grace she exhibited were immeasurable, a demonstration of the resilience that faith and family can inspire.

Following the loss of my grandfather, my grandmother drew strength not only from her unwavering faith but also from the familial bonds that surrounded her. She had a unique camaraderie with her siblings. Each one of them navigated their individual struggles with illnesses—ranging from cancer to dementia and the challenges of old age. With the loss of their significant others, they found solace and support in one another. Witnessing this interdependence among siblings underscored the profound importance of family, especially when faced with loss and sorrow.

Throughout this period, I was lured by the power of portraiture. A person’s face can reveal so much—capturing not just their present state but also glimpses of their past. This project compelled me to document them in the very homes they built and, on the land, where their shared history unfolded. The resulting portraits tell stories of resilience, familial bonds, and the enduring beauty of capturing moments in time.

To see more of this project, click here

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APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world.  She has been involved in the photography and illustration advertising and in-house corporate industry for decades.  After establishing the art-buying department at The Martin Agency, then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies, she decided to be a consultant in 1999.  Follow her at @SuzanneSease.  Instagram