Wired magazine’s iPad liftoff

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In the nine days since it launched its $4.99 iPad application, Wired has sold close to 73,000 downloads—almost as many copies as the magazine sells on the newsstand—spending five days in the No. 1 paid app slot.

via Crain’s New York Business.

There Are 7 Comments On This Article.

  1. Why is Wired experiencing such success? I dare say it comes down to 2 factors, content and presentation.

  2. Considering Wired’s techy demographic this doesn’t surprise me in the least.

    On a separate note, the censorship concerns on iPad apps have made my tablet decision an easy one-I wait for Android or a competitors tablet before I buy.

  3. I’d put it down to two more things: novelty and PR. Will be interesting to see how that number holds up in a year, when there’s a lot more content on the iPad.

  4. You have to assume the majority of people who ran out and bought iPads have done so because they like the idea of electronic distribution of content. So now they are looking for electronic content to download. At $5 the price for Wired is right, and at Timothy noted, the demographic is also a good match.

    All-in-all $365K of revenue in nine days isn’t bad. But you have to temper that with the longer view. If they are at 3.7 million downloads by this time next year, then I’ll be impressed. Right now I think these are easy sales.

  5. It will be interesting to see the churn on these downloads from month to month. As the article points out, this might be attributed to people wanting to play with their new toy.

    It is a bit optimistic to see this as a trend toward consumers being willing to pay for content. The iPad can provide a different experience through apps but wired.com and other publications’ websites are still free and accessible through an iPad.

    The bigger question is what will publishing/corporate clients pay for the enriched content. http://daveeinsel.blogspot.com/

    The technology is very cool and will only improve in the coming years. Ultimately, as mp3 players have, e-readers/pads/tablets will play a large part in our daily lives. “Ink on paper” publishing will go the way of the audio CD. Information will be chopped into even smaller bits and we will become an even more ADD culture.

    Still, there has never been a more exciting time to be a visual creative.

    • @dave einsel, Everyone can afford a mobile phone, but what percentage of the population can afford a tablet? Unless the tablet prices, and electronic subscriptions, come way down in price, these will continue to be devices for the more affluent. The digital divide grows larger.